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schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
'll come back and talk more about that and what it meant fo american foreign policy going forward. we continue our discussion on this tenth anniversary of the iraqi war with the distinguished panel of people who observed and written about the war sinces beginning. from cambridge, glrngd john burns, the london bureau chief of the "new york times." in new york, michael gordon, chiefch military correspondent r the "new york times." fouad ajami, a senior fellow of the hoomp institution. dexter filkins of the "new yorker" we hope will be joining us shortly. i go back to michael gordon.ly tell me what the judgment of history will be about our participation in the iraqi war. >> i think too much attentionwa has been paid to the decision tc go to war and not enough on the management of the withdrawal from iraq and where we go from here with iraq. because the story of iraq is not over. and we shouldn't just put thisov chapter behind us and say we're done with it. there were opportunities to be engaged with iraq by the u.s. government on the level of common citizens. there's a tbalt for influenc
, and we saw a column earlier today from a senior member of the american foreign policy council and he's suggesting that the u.s. is less popular in the middle east now than it was at the end of president george w. bush's administration. let's debate that, bring in alan colmes, the host of the alan colmes show and ben ferguson, the most of the ben ferguson show. >> hi. >> alisyn: alan, what do you think of that premise. did candidate obama said he would help to elevate our status internationally after what he believed president bush had done and that our stature was no longer as high. do you think president obama has accomplished that? >> i do and i spent time looking at the polls and our standing worldwide and particularly in the muslim world is a little higher than at the end of the bush administration. one of the problems we have is the anti-islamic video that came out about a year ago and hurt us in pakistan and hurt us in many parts of the middle east and we also were hurt in pakistan by doing something which most of us applauded, going in and getting bin laden. so there are certa
, and what it means for american foreign policy.me joining me is michael gordon.jo he is chief military correspondent for the "new york times." his new book is called "end game: theis inside story of the struggle for iraq." i am pleased to have him here back a this table. welcome. good to see you. >> glad to be here. >> rose: this is, many are say, the detailed history from t the military point of view of the iraqi war. is that a fair assessment? >> well, it-- i started out to do, that but actually, i did a little more than that in this sense-- i had a coauthor, general trainer -- a >> who you worked with before. >> i started out to do a book on the surge which i had covered before the surge, during the surge, and after the surge, onng the ground inraq, and i concluded you couldn't really evaluate the surge until youal knew what was policy was before the surge and you couldn't evaluate whether the surge worked or didn't until you found out what happened afterwards. it became kind of a political military. and one thing i did try to do which a lot of american authors haven't done, frankl
. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in iraq where the united states has already withdrawn its troops in afghanistan where we're in the process, and that means we are diminishing influence in both of those places. we still have interests there but diminishing influence. syria, a very, very hot conflict. the united states has been reluctant to get more involved, and then... and iran, of course, difficult negotiations with, you know, not necessarily any sign of progress. and then on top of all of that, secretary kerry has shown that he wants to take on the israeli-palestinian issue and see if he can make progress where others have not. >> ifill: what does his schedule,
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
'hanlon director of research and a senior of foreign policy fellow at the brookings institution. >> thank you. >> that sound that we played for the president's speech today, is what we heard a fair response to the criticism that the president hasn't acted aggressively enough? >> well it's a very fair way of looking at the theory. in theory any military operation sound appealing when you're frustrated by what you're watching and you want to make a difference. the president is certainly right to remember that when you get involved, you know, it's hard to get out and even if you start providing arms to the rebels, you implicate yourself in a way that it mayes in estate escalation. i agree that we should be arming the rebels and i consider nato arab league and combined air strikes in support of it, but i understand the president's reluctance so far. i think it's about time, though, we re-assess. you've written extensively on military options for syria. is it your view that the united states should enact an air operation? because one of assad's greatest advantages over the rebels, as you know, is
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
to make it seem like the war in iraq thing was actually a great idea and not the worst foreign policy disaster in maybe a century. there's paul wolfowitz defending it over the weekend, and michael oh han lon. and donald rumsfeld saying ten years ago began the long difficult work of liberating 25 million iraqis, all who played a roll in history deserve our respect and appreciation. the nervous thing is that he has the gall to use the word history and saying it was all about liberating the iraqi people. they're trying to do it. they're using the tenth year anniversary of the war to make you believe it didn't happen the way it happened. to try to make you believe it was all about liberating the iraqi people from the tyrant. they want you to believe what they proposed to the american people ten, will he have enyears ago, go liberate them from a tyrant. the american said we should, and we went and were greeted as lib ray tors, we knew it would take eight and a half years and cost millions and lose many people. they say it was hard but that difficult liberate work is what we signed up for a
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
. >> glenn green wells wold, thanks for coming on the program. >> the 10th average of the biggest foreign policy disaster since the vietnam war the start of the iraq invasion and occupation. since we know how it turned out no surprise that some of the media figures and poll advertises and reporters who hyped the war in 2003 actually apologized for making that mistake, if not necessarily for the thousands of americans and tens of thousands of iraqis who died. and then, there's the washington post. the editorial page beat the war drums loudly before, during and after the war began. in 2004, the post's media are the oar counted more than 140 stories the paper ran before the war that gave the bush administration's party line on the front page while burying any objections inside around page 18. now, that may sound like a fail u. to you it does to me. after the post commissioned a piece by writer greg mitchell about media failures, it clearly had second thoughts about putting that in print. for more, i'm delighted to be joined by greg mitchell. greg, thank you so much for joining us. >> thank y
accomplish? journalists and foreign policy expert a fellow at the institute of peace and wood row wilson international center joins us to talk about a few things we learned from the president's trip. first of all, you say it changed the diplomatic climate of the middle east. is that a little too optimistic? and how so? >> well, the most important thing to come out of this trip was the deal between turkey and israel. turkey is the most powerful muslim country of the 57 nations with strong muslim populations. and this makes a lot of other things possible, whether it's cooperation on syria, whether it gives the blessing to the islamic world dealings with israel, which is widely viewed as kind of an outpost of the west. so it changes the atmosphere in a lot of ways. >> robin, we always talk about the red line if you will when it comes to dealing with iran. it seemed as if at least in this trip the president successfully turned down the volume a little bit in trying to get on the same page with israel and that red line. >> well, this has been the biggest point of tension between president oba
is for a generation republicans dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better databases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at t
to get some credibility back, that's important. >> and foreign policy is a fascinating place for republicans. we've talked about the policy. there's a lot of room to grow and change. >> and a lot of disagreement. >> thank you. >> and we will be right back. [ male announcer ] from the way the bristles move to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> remember to make sure and follow andrea's travels with secretary john kerry. you can follow her on twitter @mitchellreports. my colleague tamron hall has a look at what's next on "news nation." >>> on the next hour on the eve of the supreme court hearing, protests in california, head of the historic
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
is traveling to israel in his first foreign policy trip since winning re-election. tomorrow he'll met with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. topping the agenda, iran's nuclear ambitions. thursday he will meet with mahmoud abbas. then friday it's on to jordan for meetings with king abdullah before returning back to washington on saturday. we'll be right back. [ birds chirping ] i'm your hot water heater. you hardly know i exist. that's too bad. 'cuz if my pressure relief valve gets stuck... [ booooooom! ] ...we hot water heaters can transform into rocket propelled wrecking balls. and if you got the wrong home insurance coverage, it's your bank account that might explode. so get allstate. [ dennis ] good hands. good home. make sure you have the right home protection. talk to an allstate agent. work the camera... work it! those hands. oooh la la! what's your secret? dawn? [ female announcer ] dawn hand renewal with olay beauty improves the look and feel of hands in 5 uses. love it, or get double your money back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." of all the ways the iraq war was so
. >>> tonight president obama is traveling to israel in his first foreign policy trip since winning re-election. tomorrow he'll met with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. topping the agenda, iran's nuclear ambitions. on thursday the president will tour the west bank and meet with mahmoud abbas, president of the palestinian authority. then friday it's on to jordan for meetings with king abdullah before returning back to washington on saturday. we'll be right back. [ engine sputters ] [ dennis ] allstate wants everyone to be protected on the road. whether you're an allstate customer or not. all you have to do is call. [ female announcer ] call and sign up for good hands roadside assistance today. [ dennis ] are you in good hands? >>> welcome back to "hardball." of all the ways the iraq war was sold to the american people under false pretense, one of the most galling was we could win this war on the cheap both in lives and in treasure. a new report from brown university, the cost of war study, proves just how wrong that early promise was. the cost in lives was of course overwhelm
. not to apologize for their role in arguably the worst foreign policy disaster and deception in a century, but to say actually it wasn't a disaster or a decepti deception, it was a great idea and they're not sorry and everything worked out great. >> you try to do everything you can diplomatically, without resort to force, but our history is replete with examples where ultimately we had to use force. >> and the argument this was a war you wanted? >> wanted? why, because we like war? i did what i did. it's all on the public record. and i feel very good about it. if i had to do it over again, i would do it in a minute. >> i feel very good about it. what's there to feel bad about? one of dick cheney's main cohorts in selling the iraq war to the american people was this guy, deputy defense secretary paul wolfowits, her was his contribution to the discussion this
and trade agreements with india and japan and the united states are part of the foreign policy and building those competitive -- in the world. and we can provide the economy with the infrastructure that it needs. investment largest in railways cents victorian times and spending more onerous than in a generation. and the treasury is now writing guarantees for major projects from the old power station site to build a new power station of tomorrow. we switched billions of pounds from current capital spending, to mitigate the sharp decline set in by the last government. stillpital spending is due to fall back in 2015-2016 and i don't think that this is sensible, and by using the extra savings, we will list the infrastructure by 3 billion --nds per year, with filth 15 billion of extra capital spending over the next decade, to invest in the economic arteries of this country to get growth slowing to every part of this. deputy speaker, public investment will now be higher on average as a percentage of the national income under our plan that was in the last labor government. out long- will set term
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
magazine, he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls and e-mails and tweets. each morning at seven eastern on c-span. >> 70,000 people have died since the protest of bashar al-assad and syria. there was a hearing on thursday. live coverage starts at 9:45 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> 34 years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks were created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you you as a public service by your television provider. >> edward demarco, the director of the federal housing finance agency testified on tuesday on the state of the housing market. and the future of fannie mae and freddie mac. this is two hours and 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee will come to order it without objection. the chair has authorized recess of the committee. at any time, the chair recognizes himself for two minutes for an opening statement. i would like to start off quoting from our witnesses testimony. few of us can imagine i
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
. when dick and i started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.-japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thou
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
of all, they don't like covering foreign policy stories anymore. most of the bureaus have shut down around the world. they rely on stringers. we've got a lot of propaganda coming into the american media, and i think that while the ten-year anniversary is important, it's more important for the media to look into the fact that this isn't just about nation-states or any one leader. this is about a virus, radical islam, that continues to threaten not only the middle east, but much of the rest of the world. that's the real story that needs to continue to be written, in my view. jon: let me read for you part of the piece that appeared this morning, marvin, in "the new york post" which is owned by the parent corporation of this network. they write: jon: is this, in fact, a bit of a repeat of what we accomplished in world war ii? >> no, it is not a repeat, unfortunately. at the end of world war ii, the u.s. made major efforts, put in an enormous amount of money to help japan and germany change politically, change economically, and both nations did that. in iraq what we are seeing is not the
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
's foreign policy cognizenti, can't seem to draw the obvious conclusions, stop letting these karzai guys play us as suckers and speed up our exit and stop wasting american lives and dollars. that is not very diplomatic but comes from the former head here and probably, as you probably know what a fair number of people think. is that the right prescription? in other words, he is going beyond something that you're talking about. >> it is pretty close except for some of the rhetoric because i don't think we're wasting lives and dollars there. i think we have had a mission. that mission was to remove of the taliban from control of afghanistan. and it was to try to provide the afghan security forces with the numbers and the capabilities, the skills, that they need to prevent the taliban from taking control again. that mission has, for the most part successful militarily. the part which will help to sustain it which is to have a government in afghanistan which is less corrupt, has not been as successful. but it's, nonetheless i think, going to leave afghanistan and we're not going to totally leave i
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
. and he doesn't understand that what that does is create a lack of trust. in foreign policy, the one thing i learned working with george herbert walker bush is that the most important thing in the world is for people to trust america and to have a feeling that america will be there in dealing with the national security issues. on both counts, this president obama has lost. >>steve: it is curious, because if you're just watching -- if you saw the president with netanyahu yesterday, you would think they're getting along great. in the past, for all intents and purposes, it seemed like they hated each other. the fact that b.b. netanyahu used to go to school with mitt romney, that didn't help things. but there is a quote today that apparently a senior israeli official said there was -- quote -- "a tacit agreement apparently between both leaders, if not coordination, to engage in a very intense public display of affection." >>alisyn: good. fantastic. if president obama's visit to israel helps them smooth over the tensions they had in the past and forge some sort of friendship, fantastic. even if
of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and tweets. "washington journal" every morning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> said they hired a very expensive carriage. elizabeth monroe dressed herself in her best and went to the prison where she was being held. she met with madame lafayette and basically made her case public one. some stories say, the next day, she was released. it was not the next day. it was a couple of months. it's pretty much kept her from going to the guillotine. >> in some ways, she has her own cause. she works with the washington aquino orphan asylum. in some sense, that is somewhat more and -- modern. she does work politics in her parlor. >> our conversation with historians on elizabeth monroe catherine adams. it is now available on our web site. >> other generations are asking, how do we adapt? how do we move in this fast- paced world? millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we grew up. it has brought a sense of ease and adaptability. it has brought us the ability to be resilient to the economic cr
at eastern on c-span and c-span3, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, the house foreign committee affairs allied u.s. policy toward the asia pacific region and of relations with china. he talks about north korea's's nuclear program, trade agreements, and india's role in the region. from the heritage foundation, this is about one hour. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. days, thext 13 president of the heritage foundation. i am delighted to have with us as amorning my successor new president, senator jim demint. we're happy you are here to join us. to theme all of you auditorium. it's good to see so many friends here and particularly a happy occasion for us to be able to co-host the reception afterward with the ambassador of the the republic of korea. it's very special time for korea to celebrate the first anniversary of chorus and we celebrate and commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the korean war. today, we have a number of other significant guests who are here with us representing the samsung company from their new jersey headquarters, mr. m.j. han and welcome you here on
right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physi
levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victims. testified before the senate armed services subcommittee on personnel. >> i am incredibly grateful that many of you came this morning and listened to the first two panels. that means a great deal,
understand each other. let me move quickly to a national a foreign house will. he believes such a firm should exist, that we should have a fund to help us maintain our affordable housing stock. >> congressman, beverly is outside the bill of my responsibility. that's not policy decision for the congress. i didn't come here to have an opinion about the trust fund. >> i'll accept your answer. >> thank you. >> the gentleman's time has expired and we appreciate the comments. and with that we turn now to the gentleman from virginia. >> thank you. thank you for your candor and your lead. after many long years the gst these are beginning to turn a profit. i guess i would like to hear from you the advantages and disadvantages of the return to profitability for you as concerned what should we -- has it led to any change in tactics to accomplish this reform and your part? there are things that perhaps who would be wise to look out for with this positive turn of events but also recognizing that we really do need fundamental reform and the taxpayers have ponied up north of $180 billion. >> it's hard to se
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